Eat One Egg A Day To Fend Off A Stroke


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No food has had a turnaround like eggs: once cardiovascular and cholesterol demons, they’re now considered an essential, regular part of a healthy diet.

That attitude is reinforced by a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, which suggests eggs lower your risk of having a stroke.

The research, which analysed a number of studies undertaken between 1982 and 2015, found that eating one egg per day is associated with a 12 percent reduction in stroke risk.

Strokes are one of the top killers in Australia, so lowering the chances of having one is a big deal.

So why does eating eggs fend off strokes? Dominik Alexander, a doctor from the EpidStat Institute in Michigan and the study’s principal investigator, said more research is needed to answer that question — though he does have some theories.

“Eggs do have many positive nutritional attributes, including antioxidants, which have been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation,” he said in a statement.

“They are also an excellent source of protein, which has been related to lower blood pressure.”

His team’s research also confirmed there’s no link between coronary heart disease and egg consumption, which squares with the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

Last month eggs scored yet another point in their favour from Australian research, which found that Aussies who eat more of them generally have better diets overall.

“Eggs are an extremely nutritious wholefood – a great choice in a healthy and balanced daily diet,” said CSIRO professor Manny Noakes in October.

Dr Alexander’s research was partially funded by the American Egg Board, which uses funds from egg farmers for promotion and research.

The Heart Foundation currently recommends that people consume no more than six eggs a week – which can be broken down into three meals of two eggs.

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