20 Most Expensive Cars Ever Sold

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The market for classic cars is one that just keeps growing. The world’s super-rich aren’t short of a few bob and are eager for somewhere to invest it. That has seen demand for ultra-rare cars boom in recent years, pushing classic car auction prices up ever higher. This trend looks set to continue, making the best classic, exotic and luxury cars look like fairly sound investments – if you’ve got a few spare million kicking around… And here are the most expensive cars ever sold all over the world.


20. Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta ‘Competizione’ : US$12,402,500

The Ferrari 340 Mexico was a Ferrari race car. It used 4.1l Lampredi V12 engine producing around 280bhp. Just 4 were made in 1952, 3 Vignale Berlinettas and 1 Vignale Spyder; all designed by Giovanni Michelotti.

The Ferrari 340 MM was a more powerful version of the 340 Mexico which was intended for the Carrera Panamericana. The use of Weber carburettors helped the 340 achieve 280 hp (209 kW) at 6600 rpm. 11 examples were made, 4 Pinin Farina Berlinettas, 2 Touring Spyders and 5 Vignale Spyders (designed by Giovanni Michelotti). Some were converted to 375 MM specFerrari 340-375 MM Berlinetta


19. Jaguar C-Type Works Lightweight : US$12,812,800

The Jaguar C-Type (also called the Jaguar XK120-C) is a racing sports car built by Jaguar and sold from 1951 to 1953. The “C” stands for “competition”.

The car used the running gear of the contemporary XK120 in a lightweight tubular frame and aerodynamic aluminium body. A total of 53 C-Types were built.Jaguar C-Type Works Lightweight


18. Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta ‘Tour de France’ : US$13,200,000

The 250 GT Berlinetta, nicknamed the “Long Wheelbase Berlinetta”, was also called the “Tour de France” after competing in the 10-day Tour de France automobile race. Seventy-seven Tour de France cars were built, of which a number were sold for GT races from 1956 through 1959. Construction was handled by Carrozzeria Scaglietti based on a Pinin Farina design. The engine began at 240 PS (177 kW; 237 hp) but eventually rose to 260 PS (191 kW; 256 hp). Pirelli Cinturato 165R400 tyres (CA67) were standard.

At the 1956 Geneva Motor Show, Scaglietti displayed their own 250 GT prototype, which became known as the limited-production, Series I, “no-louvre” 250 GT Berlinetta. The first customer car was built in May 1956, with production now the responsibility of Scaglietti in Modena. Fourteen “no-louvre” and nine “14-louvre” Series I and II Berliettas were made.

There were four series of 250 GT Berlinettas. In mid-1957 the Series III cars were introduced, with three louvres and covered headlights. Eighteen were produced. The 36 Series IV cars; retained the covered headlights and had a single vent louvre. Zagato also made five “no-louvre” superlight cars to Ugo Zagato’s design.18. Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta


17. McLaren F1 ‘LM-Specification’ : US$13,750,000

The McLaren F1 is a supercar designed and manufactured by McLaren Cars. Originally a concept conceived by Gordon Murray, he convinced Ron Dennis to back the project and engaged Peter Stevens to design the exterior and interior of the car. On 31 March 1998, it set the record for the world’s fastest production car, reaching 231 mph (372 km/h) with the rev limiter enabled, and 242.8 mph (390.7 km/h) with the rev limiter removed. However, the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 beat it in 2005 according to Top Gear with a top speed of 253.81 mph (408.47 km/h).McLaren F1 ‘LM-Specification


16. Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato : US$14,300,000

The DB4 is a sports car sold by Aston Martin from 1958 until 1963. Technically it was a development of the DB Mark III it replaced but with a completely new body. The DB4’s design formed the basis for later Aston Martin classics, such as the DB4 GT Zagato, the Lagonda Rapide 4-door saloon, and its ultimate replacement the Aston Martin DB5

Original uploader was Chilterngreen at de.wikipedia

Original uploader was Chilterngreen at de.wikipedia


15. Ferrari 250 LM : US$14,300,000

The mid-engined 250 Le Mans looked very much the prototype racer but was intended for production as a road-going GT. Descended from the 250 P, the Le Mans also appeared in 1963 and sported Pininfarina bodywork. Ferrari was unable to persuade the FIA that he would build the 100 examples required to homologate the car for GT racing. Eventually, 32 LMs were built[3] up to 1965. As a result, Ferrari withdrew from factory participation in the GT class of the 1965 World Sportscar Championship, allowing the Shelby Cobra team to dominate. Only the very early LM’s were true 250 models. All the others made as 3300cc models, and as such should have been named 275 LM. The early cars were converted to the 3300cc engine.Ferrari-250-LM


14. Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider : US$15,180,000

In 1959 Ferrari gave the 250 GT Berlinetta sharper handling, reducing its wheelbase from 2,600 mm to 2,400 mm. In 1960 Scaglietti revealed the 250 GT California Spyder SWB at Geneva, its body pulled more tautly over this updated chassis. Like the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB on which it was based, the revised Spyder also received disc brakes and a 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) version of the three-litre V12. It was fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato tyres (CA67). About 55 were built.Ferrari-250-GT-SWB-California-Spider


13. Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa : US$16,390,000

The racing 250 Testa Rossa was one of the most successful Ferrari racing cars in its history, with three wins at Le Mans, four wins at Sebring, and two wins at Buenos Aires. One example sold at auction for a record-breaking $16.39 million.Ferrari-250-Testa-Rossa


12. Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Speciale : US$16,500,000

One of the most notable GT racers of its time, the 1959 250 GT Berlinetta SWB used a short (2,400 mm (94.5 in)) wheelbase for better handling. Of the 176 examples built, both steel and aluminum bodies were used in various road (“lusso”) and racing trims. Engine output ranged from 240 PS (177 kW; 237 hp) to 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp). The “lusso” road car version was originally fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato (CA67).Ferrari-250-GT-SWB-Berlinetta-Speciale


11. Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider : US$16,830,000

In 1959 Ferrari gave the 250 GT Berlinetta sharper handling, reducing its wheelbase from 2,600 mm to 2,400 mm. In 1960 Scaglietti revealed the 250 GT California Spyder SWB at Geneva, its body pulled more tautly over this updated chassis. Like the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB on which it was based, the revised Spyder also received disc brakes and a 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) version of the three-litre V12. It was fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato tyres (CA67). About 55 were built.Ferrari-250-GT-SWB-California-Spider


10. Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider : US$17,160,000

In 1959 Ferrari gave the 250 GT Berlinetta sharper handling, reducing its wheelbase from 2,600 mm to 2,400 mm. In 1960 Scaglietti revealed the 250 GT California Spyder SWB at Geneva, its body pulled more tautly over this updated chassis. Like the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB on which it was based, the revised Spyder also received disc brakes and a 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) version of the three-litre V12. It was fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato tyres (CA67). About 55 were built.Ferrari-250-GT SWB-California-Spider


09. Ferrari 250 LM : US$17,600,000

The mid-engined 250 Le Mans looked very much the prototype racer but was intended for production as a road-going GT. Descended from the 250 P, the Le Mans also appeared in 1963 and sported Pininfarina bodywork. Ferrari was unable to persuade the FIA that he would build the 100 examples required to homologate the car for GT racing. Eventually, 32 LMs were built[3] up to 1965. As a result, Ferrari withdrew from factory participation in the GT class of the 1965 World Sportscar Championship, allowing the Shelby Cobra team to dominate. Only the very early LM’s were true 250 models. All the others made as 3300cc models, and as such should have been named 275 LM. The early cars were converted to the 3300cc engine.Ferrari-250-LM


08. Ferrari 375-Plus Spider Competizione : US$18,400,177

Ferrari 375 MM, was a race car produced by Ferrari in 1953 and 1954. It was named “375” for the per-cylinder displacement in the 4,5L V12 engine, and the “MM” stood for the Mille Miglia race. The engine was based on its Ferrari 375 F1 counterpart, but with smaller stroke and bigger bore. The first prototype was a Vignale Spyder and 3 next cars were Pinin Farina Berlinettas, all converted from Ferrari 340 MM. Perhaps the most known 375 MM is the “Ingrid Bergman” version, commissioned in 1954 by director Roberto Rossellini for his wife, actress Ingrid Bergman.Ferrari 375-Plus-Spider-Competizione


07. Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider : US$18,500,000

In 1959 Ferrari gave the 250 GT Berlinetta sharper handling, reducing its wheelbase from 2,600 mm to 2,400 mm. In 1960 Scaglietti revealed the 250 GT California Spyder SWB at Geneva, its body pulled more tautly over this updated chassis. Like the 250 GT Berlinetta SWB on which it was based, the revised Spyder also received disc brakes and a 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) version of the three-litre V12. It was fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato tyres (CA67). About 55 were built.Ferrari-250-GT-SWB-California-Spider


06. Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale : US$26,400,000

For the 1965 racing season, 4 lightweight 275 GTB Competizione Speciales (1964), a prototype and three production models, were built and equipped with 250 LM engines. The design was by Pininfarina and the coachwork by Scaglietti. The design incorporated reduced weight with a ten percent reduction in size, smaller diameter chassis, 21 gauge alloy body, Plexiglas windows, and magnesium was used in certain engine and transaxle castings. The Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) at first refused to homologate the model as a GT contender but settled on a compromise when Enzo Ferrari threatened to abandon the motor sport.Ferrari 275-GTB-C Speciale


05. Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider : US$27,500,000

A 275 GTB/4 N.A.R.T. Spyder version was only available from a single American dealer, Luigi Chinetti. He asked Sergio Scaglietti and Enzo Ferrari to build a few Spyder, a convertible with no roof, versions of the 275 GTB/4, which he bought for approximately $8,000 each; N.A.R.T. stood for Chinetti’s North American Racing Team. It was to be a custom run of 25 cars straight from Scaglietti, but because of low sales, just 10 were built in 1967 and 1968, making this one of the most valuable Ferraris.[5] The ten NART Spiders used chassis numbers 09437, 09751, 10139, 10219, 10249, 10453, 10691, 10709, 10749, and 11057.Ferrari 275-GTB-4-S-NART-Spider


04. Ferrari 290 MM : US$28,050,000

The Ferrari 290 MM was a Ferrari race car produced in 1956. It was developed to compete in the 1956 edition of Mille Miglia, whence the acronym “MM”, and produced in four units.[1]

Engine was a V12 at 60°, derived from the 4.5 liter which was then used in the scuderia’s Formula One cars. Displacement was 3490 cm³, for a maximum power of some 320 HP at 7200 rpm, and a maximum speed of 280 kilometres per hour (170 mph).

The car won the 1956 Mille Miglia, raced by Eugenio Castellotti, while another 290 MM, led by Juan Manuel Fangio, arrived fourth. Phil Hill and Maurice Trintignant also won the Swedish Grand Prix of that year, granting Ferrari the overall victory in the World Sportscar Championship. The following year a 290 MM won the 1000 km Buenos Aires.Ferrari-290 MM


03. Mercedes-Benz W196 : US$29,600,000

The Mercedes-Benz W196 was a Formula One racing car produced by Mercedes-Benz for the 1954 and 1955 F1 seasons. Successor to the W194, in the hands of Juan Manuel Fangio and Stirling Moss it won 9 of 12 races entered and captured the only two world championships in which it competed.

Firsts included the use of desmodromic valves and Daimler-Benz developed mechanical direct fuel injection adapted from the DB 601 high-performance V12 used on the Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighter during World War II.Mercedes-Benz W196


02. Ferrari 335S : US$35,711,359

The Ferrari 335 S was a sports racing car produced by Italian manufacturer Ferrari in 1957-1958. Four cars were produced in total. An evolution of the 315 S, it had V12 engine with a greater 4023.32 cc displacement and a maximum power of 390 horsepower (290 kW) at 7400 rpm; the maximum speed was around 300 kilometres per hour (190 mph). The car was a direct response to the Maserati 450S which with its 4.5 litre engine was threatening to overpower the 3.8 litre 315S and 3.5 litre 290MM.

This model was the protagonist of the accident in the 1957 Mille Miglia, which led to the cancellation of the race starting from the following year. In its World Championship debut in the 3rd round of the 1957 season, a 335S (#531), driven by Spanish driver Alfonso de Portago (who had replaced an ill Luigi Musso) was in third position, running on a long straight road sector between the Lombard hamlets of Cerlongo and Guidizzolo. When one of the tyres exploded, de Portago’s car slipped to the right and crashed against a large crowd, killing nine people, as well as de Portago himself and American co-driver Edmund Nelson. The other 335S in the hands of Peter Collins and Louis Klementaski had broken down whilst in the lead giving victory to a 315S driven by Piero Taruffi.Ferrari-335S


01. Ferrari 250 GTO : US$38,115,000 – The most expensive car

The Ferrari 250 GTO is a homologated GT car which was produced by Ferrari from 1962 to 1964 for homologation into the FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car category. In May 2012 the 1962 250 GTO made for Stirling Moss became the world’s most expensive car in history, selling in a private transaction for $38,115,000 to US communications magnate Craig McCaw. In October 2013, Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo sold chassis number 5111GT to an unnamed buyer for a new record, somewhere within the $38 million range. The numerical part of its name denotes the displacement in cubic centimeters of each cylinder of the engine, whilst GTO stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”, Italian for “Grand Touring Homologated.” When new, the GTO cost $18,000 in the United States, and buyers had to be personally approved by Enzo Ferrari and his dealer for North America, Luigi Chinetti.Ferrari 250 GTO

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